Leaderboard

2022 Upcoming Holiday deadlines: We will be closed for Monday, July 4 for the 4th of July holiday. Make sure to get your news and ads in by regular deadline, Friday before 4 p.m. We will be closed for the Labor Day holiday Monday, Sept. 5. Make sure to get your news and ads in by regular deadline, Friday before 4 p.m. We will be closed for Veteran’s Day, Nov. 11. Early deadline is Thursday, Nov. 10 by 4 p.m. We will be closed for Thanksgiving Nov. 23-28. Everything must be in by Fri., Nov. 18th. We have to go to press early for the Thanksgiving holiday. Santa Letters deadline is Friday, Dec. 2. Christmas & New Years deadlines are Friday, Dec. 16. We will be closed Dec. 22–Jan. 1 for Christmas and New Year’s holidays.

Hale County Animal Shelter Pet of the Week: Angel is a gorgeous girl with the most arresting eyes! Very sweet and incredibly smart. Would make a great addition to an active family. Angel is around 4 months old. Remember to always spay and neuter your pets. Don’t forget, cats and kittens are still $15.

Church & Community Events

Moundville Hosts Saturday In The Park
The UA Moundville Archaeological Park will host Saturday in the Park, a series of demonstrations and presentations related to Native Americans, archaeology, natural history, sustainable gardening and more, throughout the summer. The July 9 event will feature hoop dancing and native drumming with Lyndon Alec and Dan Isaac. Saturday in the Park activities are free with paid admission to the park. For more information, contact Lindsey Gordon, UA Moundville Archaeological Park, at fgordon@aalan.ua.edu.


Red Cross
Make an appointment to give blood or platelets as soon as possible by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Tuscaloosa: 7/11: 11:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., University Mall, 1701 McFarland Blvd. E.


Alabama Historical Commission Hosts Free Workshop on Historic Preservation Tax Incentives
The Alabama Historical Commission (AHC), in partnership with the Selma-Dallas County Chamber of Commerce, will present a free Historic Preservation Tax Incentives Workshop on Thursday, July 7 from 1-4 p.m. at The Anchor, 15 Franklin Street, Selma. This event is for community planners, developers, historic property owners, real estate agents, economic development specialists, historic preservationists, and municipal leaders who want to learn more about utilizing vacant and/or historic buildings in their communities. This workshop will demonstrate the intrinsic value of historic tax credits as economic development tools such as providing incentives to invest in older structures, stabilizing neighborhoods, and creating local jobs for skilled workers. The Alabama Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit is a 25% refundable state tax credit available for historic property owners who substantially rehabilitate properties that are listed in or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places and are 60 years old or older. The tax credit provides jobs, increases the tax base, and revitalizes existing buildings and infrastructure, while preserving and rehabilitating Alabama’s historic properties. The Federal Historic Preservation Tax Incentives program is a 20% income tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic, income-producing buildings. Properties must be income-producing and listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The National Park Service is the federal agency that administers the program, and the AHC is the point of contact for anyone who applies for tax credits for properties in Alabama. The Federal Historic Preservation Tax Incentives Program is the single-largest Federal program that specifically supports historic preservation and is one of the nation’s most effective programs to promote historic preservation and community revitalization. Property owners may simultaneously apply for both the state and federal tax incentive programs. All applicants are required to follow the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation while performing repairs to properties.

Hale County Soil and Water Conservation District Board
The Hale County Soil and Water Conservation District Board will hold a meeting on June 30, 2022 at 8:00 a.m. at 8388 Alabama Highway 69 Greensboro.


Sawyerville Community Family, Friends, & Community Parade & Cookout
Join us 141 G.W. Jackson Family Park Dr., Sawyerville on for a parade on Sat., July 2, at noon. Line up is at 11 a.m. Featuring 2 drum majors from Atlanta. Ga. The Parade will begin at the corner of Hwy. 14 and Co. Rd. 77, and continues into the G.W. Jackson Family Park! There will be a cookout, fun and games directly after the parade inside the park and we will end the evening with Fireworks! Everyone is Welcome! Please come join us and bring the kids! For more information, go to gwjacksonfamilypark.com.

one entity and must be used within two years of receiving the grant. Applicants must submit an official 2023 Historic Sites Grant application available on the AleHteCawnebsite at ahc.alabama.gov/resources/grants.aspx. Applications must be hand delivered, mailed, or emailed to LaTarra Tetter, AHC Grants Manager. To learn more about the Alabama Historical Commission, please visit ahc.alabama.gov.


School Events


SSCC Offering Collegiate 100® Scholarship For Fall 2022
Tuscaloosa, Alabama – Shelton State Community College has added a new scholarship for students enrolling in the fall 2022 semester. The College’s Collegiate 100® is now accepting applications for membership and scholarship. Applications are being accepted until June 30, 2022. The new Collegiate 100® scholarship will waive tuition and fees for selected members for up to sixteen hours for the fall 2022 and spring 2023 semesters and up to twelve hours for the summer 2023 semester. First-time, new, current, or potential Shelton State students are eligible for the Collegiate 100® scholarship award. Applicants must have a GPA of 2.0 or greater to qualify. The Collegiate 100® scholarship selection process is based on applicants’ leadership potential, communication skill, ability to mentor peers, and commitment to Shelton State and the Collegiate 100® organization. In addition to these qualifications, candidates will also be ranked on their academic history and performance in an interview. (Selected applicants will be contacted via email to schedule an interview on the Martin Campus.) One of the College’s most active students organizations, Collegiate 100® provides an avenue for chapters of 100 Black Men of America, Inc. to continue their one-on-one mentoring program for students as they matriculate from high school to college. The program supports the initiatives set forth by the 100 Way Across a Lifetime organization. Both local Collegiate 100® chapters were established under the leadership of the 100 Black Men of West Alabama, Inc. For more information about Collegiate 100®, contact Eric Prewitt at eric.prewitt@sheltonstate.edu.


SSCC Reopening Scholarship Application For Students Pursing Careers In Nontraditional Career Fields
Shelton State Community College is reopening the scholarship application for students pursuing careers in fields considered gender nontraditional. Applications will be accepted through June 10. Applicants must complete the Perkins Scholarship application and the College’s admission application (if not already admitted or enrolled) and must plan to enroll in a gender nontraditional program of study.
The term “gender nontraditional” refers to occupations or areas of work, including careers in computer science, technology, and other emerging high skill occupations in which individuals from one gender comprise less than 25 percent of the individuals employed in that occupation or field. Female nontraditional careers are occupations in which less than 25 percent of individuals employed are female. Male nontraditional careers are occupations in which less than 25 percent of the individuals employed are male.
Many current and former Shelton State Community College students have found enrolling in a nontraditional gender program to be a rewarding and life-changing experience. To hear from several of these students, as well as College administrators, visit Shelton Statements – Gender Nontraditional. The scholarship eligible programs of study are viewable by gender on the Shelton State Perkins Scholarship application. To view the gender nontraditional scholarship eligible programs and to apply for the scholarship, visit Shelton State Perkins Scholarship or sheltonstate.edu. Visit sheltonstate.edu to learn more or apply.

Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library
Success By 6 of United Way of West Alabama is proud to provide Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library books FREE to children ages birth to 5 years old in Greene, Hale, Marengo, Pickens, Sumter, and Tuscaloosa counties. Once a month, your child will receive a new book by mail. You only need to do two things: register your child and pledge to read the books to him/her. Please, climb on board Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library! Since UWWA launched the Dolly Parton Imagination Library: 13,467 children have participated in the program in Greene, Hale, Marengo, Pickens, Sumter, and Tuscaloosa Counties. 10,427 children have “graduated” from the program. 443,856 books have been delivered to children in West Alabama. Sign up at https://imaginationlibrary.com/check-availability/

Southern Academy School Calendar

UA TO DEMOLISH TUTWILER HALL — The University of Alabama will implode the old Tutwiler Hall Monday, July 4, at 7 a.m. Because of the location of the building and large safety area, the visibility of the implosion will be greatly limited. Those wishing to view the implosion are encouraged to watch UA’s livestreamFor more information, contact Shane Dorrill, UA Strategic Communications, at shane.dorrill@ua.edu
UA PROGRAMS PREPARE RURAL ALABAMA STUDENTS FOR HEALTH CAREERS — High school students from rural Alabama communities are participating in programs this summer at The University of Alabama where they are learning about the need rural communities have for more doctors and other health care professionals. Through the Minority Rural Health Scholars Program and the Rural Health Scholars Program, both part of the UA College of Community Health Sciences, 34 students are spending five weeks on the UA campus taking college courses for credit, shadowing physicians and learning how to prepare to enter health professions education and training. For more information, contact Leslie Zganjar, UA College of Community Health Sciences, at lzganjar@ua.edu 
UA TO HOLD SUMMER COMMENCEMENT — The University of Alabama will hold a summer commencement ceremony Saturday, Aug. 6, at 9 a.m. at Coleman Coliseum. Around 1,000 degree candidates from all colleges and schools are expected to be in attendance. For more information, contact Shane Dorrill, UA Strategic Communications, at shane.dorrill@ua.edu
DEAN’S LIST STUDENTS NAMED FOR UA SPRING 2022 TERM — A total of 11,224 students enrolled during Spring Semester 2022 were named to the dean’s list with an academic record of 3.5 (or higher) or the president’s list with an academic record of 4.0 (all A’s). 
UA EARLY COLLEGE STUDENTS NAMED TO SPRING 2022 DIRECTOR’S LIST — More than 400 students enrolled in UA Early College during Spring Semester 2022 were named to the director’s list with an academic record of 3.6 (or higher). UA Early College allows high school students to get a head start on their college courses. High school sophomores, juniors and seniors enrolled in UA Early College can choose from more than 80 different online and on-campus courses and earn up to 30 hours of college credit. 
CURRENT COMMENT 
HIGH TEMPERATURES CAN QUICKLY CAUSE DEHYDRATION — Dehydration, the loss of fluid from the body, is impacted by activity intensity relative to temperature, humidity, wind speed, and direct or indirect sunlight,” said Dr. Jeri Zemke, assistant professor with the UA College of Human Environmental Sciences. “Additionally, if an individual begins their activity in a partially dehydrated state, it will take less time for their body to begin displaying physical impairments brought on by dehydration. Some of those symptoms include headache, muscle cramping, nausea/vomiting, general weakness and dizziness. Treatment includes moving the person to a shaded or air-conditioned area, providing fluids, removal of excessive clothing, and cooling with fans, ice towels or ice bags. Dehydration may be prevented by beginning exercise in a hydrated state, performing activities during cooler hours of the day or in the shade, having access to unlimited fluid intake and frequent breaks in the shade. An easy way to access your hydration status is to monitor the color of your urine. Urine the color of lemonade, or lighter, indicates you are in a hydrated state, while urine darker than lemonade suggests you are either dehydrated, or moving toward a dehydrated state. Also, thirst is a very poor indicator of dehydration. If you wait until you are thirsty to drink fluids, you are probably already dehydrated.” To schedule an interview, contact Zemke at jzemke@ches.ua.edu.  
ECONOMY STILL HAS MOMENTUM AS SLOWDOWN LOOMS — At some points, higher interest rates combined with price inflation and high personal and corporate debt will take a toll on consumer and business spending, bringing an economic slowdown, said Ahmad Ijaz, economist and executive director of the UA Center for Business and Economic Research. “There is still a lot of momentum in the economy, but we will definitely start seeing a slowdown maybe in the second half or early next year,” Ijaz said. A clearer picture will be available once second quarter economic data is received near the end of July, he said. To schedule an interview, contact Ijaz at aijaz@cba.ua.edu
WHAT’S NEXT AFTER SUPREME COURT DECISION? — After the Supreme Court’s decision in the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization case, which overturned Roe v. Wade, states are now able to make their own laws governing abortion. “The decision removes abortion as a federally protected constitutional right,” said Dr. Allen Linken, associate professor of political science. “This doesn’t make abortion legal or illegal, per se, but removes a layer that was stopping states from managing that right. Now that the right is no longer protected at the federal level, it makes it a state-by-state determination using state constitutions and state laws.” Linken says that the majority opinion in the Dobbs case suggests that other rights under the umbrella of the right to privacy may be revisited, potentially including the right to use contraceptives, the right to engage in personal sexual choices, and the right to same-sex marriage. “How the Court views the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment in the next few years as cases arise will be important to understand the personal freedoms afforded to individuals,” he said. To schedule an interview, contact Linken at aelinken@ua.edu
EVENTS 
MOUNDVILLE HOSTS SATURDAY IN THE PARK — The UA Moundville Archaeological Park will host Saturday in the Park, a series of demonstrations and presentations related to Native Americans, archaeology, natural history, sustainable gardening and more, throughout the summer. The July 9 event will feature hoop dancing and native drumming with Lyndon Alec and Dan Isaac. Saturday in the Park activities are free with paid admission to the park. For more information, contact Lindsey Gordon, UA Moundville Archaeological Park, at fgordon@aalan.ua.edu.